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Section 21: Stopping Markers

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A series of signs may be located along the lineside at certain places, referring to various lengths of freight trains. Train length can be expressed either in terms of the number of wagons [21.26 & 21.27] or in 'standard length units' (S.L.U.s) [21.28 - 21.31]. One S.L.U. is equal to 21 feet.

[21.26] Wagon Marker Board.
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain
[21.27] HAA Wagon Marker Board.
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Historical
[21.28] S.L.U. Marker.
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain
[21.29] S.L.U. Marker.
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain
[21.30] S.L.U. Marker.
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain
[21.31] S.L.U. Marker.
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain

The introduction of Class 253 & 254 'High Speed Trains', comprising a number of coaches with a diesel locomotive at each end, necessitated their own special stop markers being provided. In many places, the standard type of car stop marker was used, with the usual figure replaced by "H" or "HST" [21.32 & 21.33]. Alternatively, the marker may bear only a letter "H" [21.34]. Other types of markers exist, which specify the number of vehicles in the train [21.35 - 21.37].

[21.32] HST Stop Marker.
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Current
[21.33] HST Stop Marker.
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Current
[21.34] HST Stop Marker.
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent
[21.35] HST Stop Marker (e.g. 2 power cars plus 9 coaches).
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain
[21.36] HST Stop Marker (e.g. 10 cars).
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain
[21.37] HST Stop Marker (e.g. 10 or 12 cars).
Area: Various   Usage: Low   Status: Uncertain

At a handful of stations, signs or indicators are provided to mark the point at which platforms are subdivided for platform sharing purposes. At Bristol Temple Meads, boards showing a diagonal yellow cross on a black background [21.38] were provided (by 1980) to subdivide the through platforms into two parts, each of which had separate platform numbers. Drivers had to deduce from the route indication (i.e. the platform number) displayed at the previous main signal whether or not the train must be stopped at the indicator board. If signalled to stop at the board, the train was not then permitted to pass it unless a handsignal was given by the person in charge of the platform.

[21.38] Platform Demarcation Board.
Area: Bristol Temple Meads   Usage: Medium   Status: Historical

Stop markers for High Speed Trains were provided at certain terminus stations on the Western Region. These consisted of a segmented yellow disc suspended above the driver's eye level [21.39].

[21.39] HST Stop Marker.
Area: Western Region   Usage: Low   Status: Historical

Stop markers applicable to the Advanced Passenger Train (Prototype) (APT-P) were provided at certain locations in 1980 [21.40]. These markers were positioned in the 'four-foot' (between the running rails) ahead of the actual stopping point and drivers of the APT were required to stop the train immediately they lost sight of the marker.

[21.40] APT Stop Marker.
Area: Various   Usage: Low   Status: Historical

In 1981, stop markers with red and white diagonal stripes [21.41] were positioned on the buffer stops of Platforms 6 and 7 at Glasgow Queen Street High Level station. Drivers of High Speed Trains running into either of these platforms were required to stop the train immediately they lost sight of the marker board. Both marker boards were removed in 2016.

[21.41] HST Stop Marker Board. Click Here for Photo
Area: Glasgow Queen Street   Usage: Low   Status: Historical

Stop markers exist for specific types of trains. The marker will bear one or more codes [21.42 & 21.43] representing the type(s) of trains to which it applies.

The types of trains to which the markers may apply are identified by the following letters:

The type of train may alternatively be spelled out in full [21.44].

[21.42] Stop Marker.
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Current
[21.43] Stop Marker.
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Current
[21.44] Stop Marker.
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Current

'Gatwick Express' services began in 1984, running between Gatwick Airport and London Victoria stations. Stop markers applicable to these trains were prefixed with the letters "GX" [21.45].

[21.45] 'Gatwick Express' Stop Marker.
Area: London Victoria - Gatwick Airport   Usage: Low   Status: Historical

In 1988, the original platform demarcation boards at Bristol Temple Meads (see [21.38]) were replaced by double-sided indicators showing a black St. Andrew's cross on a permanently illuminated white background or, in the case of Platforms 5 and 6, reflectorised boards [21.46]. If signalled to stop at the indicator, it must not then be passed without verbal permission from the signalman.

[21.46] St. Andrew's Cross Indicator. Click Here for Photo
Area: Bristol Temple Meads   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent

In 1990, a stop marker bearing a letter "E" was provided on Platform 1 at Inverness station, suspended from the station roof [21.47]. This marker applies only to Class 158 ('Express') diesel multiple units.

[21.47] "E Stop" Marker.
Area: Inverness   Usage: Low   Status: Current

The 'InterCity 225' trains entered service on the East Coast Main Line in 1990. These trains comprise a Class 91 electric locomotive, nine Mark 4 coaches and a Driving Van Trailer (DVT). At both ends of Dunbar station in 1991, stop markers reading "IC225 stop" were provided [21.48]. These markers only apply when the train is being driven from the locomotive (not the DVT). Stop markers with the words "DVT 9 locomotive" were installed at Berwick-upon-Tweed station [21.49].

[21.48] InterCity 225 Stop Marker.
Area: Dunbar   Usage: Low   Status: Current
[21.49] InterCity 225 Stop Marker.
Area: Berwick-upon-Tweed   Usage: Low   Status: Current