Home Page > Section 13; pages: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Section 13: Permanent Speed Restriction Signs

(Page 3 of 6)


A range of experimental reflectorised permanent speed restriction indicator signs [13.43 - 13.46] was put on trial at a site near Bishopbriggs on the Scottish Region in November 1984. One sign was simply a reflectorised version of the existing 'cut-out' design of indicator (see [13.17]). Another was a larger version of the equivalent road sign and similar to the speed signs that were then in use throughout the Tyne & Wear Metro system [13.45].

[13.43] Experimental Permanent Speed Restriction Sign.
Area: Bishopbriggs   Usage: Low   Status: Historical
[13.44] Experimental Permanent Speed Restriction Sign.
Area: Bishopbriggs   Usage: Low   Status: Historical
[13.45] Experimental Permanent Speed Restriction Sign (subsequently adopted as standard).
Area: Bishopbriggs (subsequently All Areas)   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.46] Experimental Permanent Speed Restriction Sign.
Area: Bishopbriggs   Usage: Low   Status: Historical

In May 1985, a special speed restriction sign was installed on the Up Main line at Acton Main Line (Western Region) to indicate a higher permissible speed applicable to HSTs. This sign, which was of a five-sided shape with the letters "HST" and the speed figure in black on a yellow background [13.47], was co-located with an ordinary speed sign. The higher speed applied as far as the next ordinary speed sign.

[13.47] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign applicable to HSTs.
Area: Acton Main Line   Usage: Low   Status: Historical

In June 1985, two experimental permanent speed restriction indicator signs were placed on a bridge abutment between Ruscombe and Maidenhead (Western Region) for evaluation purposes.

In 1985, the Scottish Region chose the circular permanent speed restriction sign with a red border (see [13.45]) as its new regional standard and made a start on installing these on a number of routes in place of the previous 'cut-out' signs. Where a restriction applied to a diverging route, an arrow was fitted below the speed sign [13.48 & 13.49] in a manner similar to the earlier 'cut-out' signs. A standard differential speed restriction was indicated by two signs placed one above the other on the same post [13.50].

[13.48] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign with Directional Arrow (e.g. applicable to left-hand divergence). Click Here for Photo
Area: Scottish Region   Usage: High   Status: Obsolescent
[13.49] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign with Directional Arrows applicable to divergences in both directions.
Area: Scottish Region   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent
[13.50] Standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign.
Area: Scottish Region   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent

In January 1986, an experimental reflectorised type of 'preliminary speed board' was put on trial at two sites on the Edinburgh - Glasgow line. The board was shaped like an inverted triangle and had a yellow background [13.51]. This was intended as a replacement for the earlier floodlit advance warning indicators (see [13.24]).

[13.51] Experimental Preliminary Speed Board.
Area: Edinburgh - Glasgow   Usage: Low   Status: Historical

In March 1986, the permanent speed restriction signs between Tonbridge and Bopeep Junction (near Hastings) were replaced with reflectorised signs. The new signs had black figures on a circular white background, surrounded by a black border [13.52].

[13.52] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign.
Area: Tonbridge - Bopeep Junction   Usage: Medium   Status: Historical

The new design of reflectorised advance warning indicator introduced as standard in September 1986 was similar in shape to the trial version (see [13.51]) but had a white background and a yellow border [13.53]. The shape of the sign is modified to a five-sided variant where there is limited clearance or where extra width or height is needed to accommodate the speed figure [13.54].

[13.53] Advance Warning Indicator. Click Here for Photo
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.54] Advance Warning Indicator (alternative shape).
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current

An advance warning indicator for a standard differential speed restriction is usually a five-sided shape [13.55], although a triangular variant was used on the Western Region [13.56]. An advance warning indicator for a non-standard differential speed restriction is also a five-sided shape [13.57].

[13.55] Advance Warning Indicator applicable to a standard differential permanent speed restriction.
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.56] Advance Warning Indicator applicable to a standard differential permanent speed restriction.
Area: Western Region   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent
[13.57] Advance Warning Indicator applicable to a non-standard differential permanent speed restriction. Click Here for Photo
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current

An advance warning indicator applicable to a speed restriction on a diverging route is fitted with a directional arrow pointing in the appropriate direction. The arrow sign is usually placed above the warning indicator [13.58], except on the Scottish Region, where it was originally placed below [13.59] to be consistent with the placing of the directional arrow below the Scottish Region's circular PSR signs (see [13.48]). Two arrows are displayed if the advance warning indicator applies to restrictions of equal speed on diverging routes to the left and the right [13.60 & 13.61].

[13.58] Advance Warning Indicator with Directional Arrow (e.g. applicable to left-hand diverging route).
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.59] Advance Warning Indicator with Directional Arrow (e.g. applicable to right-hand diverging route).
Area: Predominantly Scottish Region   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent
[13.60] Advance Warning Indicator with Directional Arrows applicable to diverging routes in both directions.
Area: All Areas   Usage: Medium   Status: Current
[13.61] Advance Warning Indicator with Directional Arrows applicable to diverging routes in both directions.
Area: Predominantly Scottish Region   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent

In 1987, the permanent speed restriction signs on a portion of the East Coast Main Line between Grantham and Bawtry, south of Doncaster (Eastern Region), were replaced by circular reflectorised signs of the type that was standard on the Scottish Region (see [13.45]). Where a directional arrow sign was provided, however, it was positioned above the speed board [13.62 & 13.63]. Locating the directional arrows above the speed boards became standard practice throughout BR as the new circular signs were introduced, except on the Scottish Region, where they continued to be placed below the speed boards until c.2003.

[13.62] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign with Directional Arrow (e.g. applicable to right-hand divergence). Click Here for Photo
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.63] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign with Directional Arrows applicable to divergences in both directions.
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current

The Scottish Region style of reflectorised PSR indicator (see [13.45]) was adopted as the standard form for use throughout BR in 1988. Concurrently, a new design of standard differential speed restriction sign was introduced in which both speeds are exhibited on a single board and separated by a horizontal bar [13.64]. In areas of limited clearance, an elliptical sign may be used [13.65].

[13.64] Standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign. Click Here for Photo
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.65] Standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign for use in areas of limited clearance.
Area: All Areas   Usage: Medium   Status: Current